White-Faced Saki

White-Faced Saki

The White-Faced Saki (Pithecia Pithecia), also known as the Guianan Saki and the Golden-Faced Saki, is a New World Monkey in the Pitheciinae subfamily of the Pitheciidae family of monkeys, and is found in areas of Brazil, Guyana , French Guiana, Suriname, and Venezuela. The White-Faces Saki is a small-sized monkey with a long, bushy tail; and they have highly adapted bodies with strong leg muscles to allow jumping from tree to tree. With a diet mainly consisting of fruit, these adaptations making them well-suited for life in trees is vital for the Whites-Faced Saki to thrive in the rainforest.

Habitat

The White-Faced Saki is found in areas of Brazil, Guyana , French Guiana, Suriname, and Venezuela. Living predominately in the understory and lower canopy of the forest, the White-Faced Saki is specifically adapted to life in trees with increased leg strength to jump more effectively from tree to tree and rarely descends to the forest floor. Typically, they run and maneuver on all four limbs and have been observed jumping very long distances. The White-Faced Saki even sleeps in the limbs of trees, curling around as you would expect from a common house cat.

Diet

The White-Faced Saki is considered a frugivore, meaning its diet consists predominately of fruits found in the rainforest canopy. In fact, the diet of the White-Face Saki consists of nearly 90% fruit with the remaining 10% being a combination of leaves, flowers, and insects. Unlike most other New World Monkeys, White-Faced Sakis have a specialized form of feeding that focuses specifically on the seeds of unripened fruits. This special niche allows them to have an ample food supply because most other frugivores do not eat fruit until it has ripened and fully matured.

Fun White-Faced Saki Facts

  1. White-Faced Sakis have specially adapted and strong hind legs that are allow for longer jumps.
  2. The diet of the White-Face Saki consists of nearly 90% fruit.
  3. The White-Faced Saki sleeps in the limbs of trees, curling around as you would expect from a common house cat.
  4. Spending almost 100% of their time in the lower canopy of the rainforest, the White-Faced Saki almost never descends to the forest floor.