Equatorial Saki

Equitorial Saki

The Equatorial Saki (Pithecia Aequatorialis) is a New World Monkey in the Pitheciinae subfamily of the Pitheciidae family of monkeys, and is found in areas of Ecuador and Peru. The Equatorial Saki is one of the most unique looking members of the Saki monkey group with graish0black fur on its body and white fur on its hands, feet, and portions of its head and face. Considered diurnal animals, Equatorial Sakis stay almost exclusively in the trees and very rarely, if ever, go on land. The life expectancy of an Equatorial Saki is between 25 and 30 years depending on the sex of the monkey.

Habitat

Though the Equatorial Saki is typically found in Ecuador, it has been observed in some areas of Peru as well. Calling the canopy of the rainforest in these regions its habitat, the Equatorial Saki will only rarely descend to the forest floor. Unless there is a gap in the trees that is too large for them to leap with their specially adapted limbs, it is very common for the Equatorial Saki to never touch solid land. They typically move through the trees using all four limbs, sometimes proceeding in an upright position on their hind legs while moving over the branches. The Equatorial Saki is an extremely gifted jumper capable of leaping great distances from a stable position.

Diet

The Equatorial Saki engages in a specialized form of frugivory in which they focus specifically on unripe fruits and seeds. This is a common trait shared among most members of the Saki group, but is very unique from other New World Monkeys. This also allows for an abundance of food for the Equatorial Saki, because no other primates in their area are feeding on the same source of sustenance. The Equatorial Saki comprises nearly 90% of their diet up of these fruits and seeds, with the remaining 10% being filled by other plants, leaves, and small insects such as spiders.

Fun Equatorial Saki Facts

  1. Equatorial Saki monkeys have precisely adapted bodies that feature strong leg muscles to make it easier for them to jump from tree to tree; which is where they spend virtually all of their life.
  2. The Equatorial Saki engages in a specialized form of frugivory in which they focus specifically on unripe fruits and seeds.
  3. The Equatorial Saki comprises nearly 90% of their diet up of these fruits and seeds, with the remaining 10% being filled by other plants, leaves, and small insects such as spiders.
  4. Unless there is a gap in the trees that is too large for them to leap with their specially adapted limbs, it is very common for the Equatorial Saki to never touch solid land.