Black-Striped Capuchin

Black-Striped Capuchin

The Black-Striped Capuchin (Sapajus Libidinosus), also known as the Bearded Capuchin, is a New World Monkey in the Cebidae family of monkeys and is found in areas of Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina. Like some other types of Capuchins in South America, the Black-Striped Capuchin has been observed using stones as anvils and hammers to access to nuts inside hard shells. The Black-Striped Capuchin has several adaptations specific to using stones as tools including stronger back and leg muscles than found on other species to allow for carrying stones while walking on only their hind legs. Once considered a subspecies of the Tufted Capuchin, the Black-Striped Capuchin achieved species status only recently.

Habitat

The Black-Striped Capuchin can be found in forest and woodland areas of Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina. They prefer lower lying forest regions along river banks such as those found in the Caatinga, Cerrado, and Pantanal of Brazil, as well as from the upper Juruá River east and south to Mato Grosso. The Black-Striped Capuchin spends equal time between the forest canopy and the forest floor depending on which source of food it is after at the time. With its entire habitat surrounded by populations of Tufted Capuchins, there has been much debate about awarding the Black-Striped Capuchin species status until recently.

Diet

Black-Striped Capuchins have a unique attribute that only a few other types of Capuchins share. With their specially adapted back and leg muscles, the Black-Striped Capuchin is able to hoist large stones above its head and smash it down on hard shelled nuts like a hammer to release food inside. While like all other Capuchins they are omnivores, they are one of the few types of Capuchins to have the ability to access nuts. The higher protein content in their diet allows them to dominate their area more effectively.

Besides nuts, the Black-Striped Capuchin eats a wide range of food sources including nuts, fruit, eggs, birds, frogs, lizards, spiders, and other small insects. Spending approximately equal amounts of time foraging for nuts, plants, and small animal prey, the Black-Striped Capuchin spends equal time in the canopy as it does at ground level.

Fun Black-Striped Capuchin Facts

  1. The Black-Striped Capuchin has been observed using stones as anvils and hammers to access to nuts inside hard shells; using specially adapted back and leg muscles to hoist the stones above their head.
  2. The Black-Striped Capuchin spends equal time between the forest canopy and the forest floor depending on which source of food it is after at the time.
  3. Besides nuts, the Black-Striped Capuchin eats a wide range of food sources including nuts, fruit, eggs, birds, frogs, lizards, spiders, and other small insects.
  4. The higher protein content in the Black-Striped Capuchin’s diet allows them to dominate their area more effectively.
  5. With its entire habitat surrounded by populations of Tufted Capuchins, there has been much debate about awarding the Black-Striped Capuchin species status until recently.